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[an error occurred while processing this directive]Thursday, 15-Nov-2018 06:33:34 GMTBarbelith Webzine  
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The Autopsy - spectacle or science?
In Laboratory
The Autopsy - spectacle or science?
The first public autopsy in Britain for 170 years was greeted with reactions almost as predictable as the process of the postmortem itself. But why have the medical establishment and the media been so squeamish? Brooke Magnanti investigates. more >

In Music
Crass: Still Relevant in 2002?
From 1978 to 1984, the seminal punk band Crass shook the music world down to its ideological roots, attacking hypocrisy and authoritarianism with little more than a fierce do-it-yourself attitude, a cutting sense of humour. At their height, without radio play, advertising or major label support, the band could sell 20,000 singles in a week. Their condemnation of Thatcher and the Falklands War, "How Does It Feel to Be Mother of 1,000 Dead," saw them discussed in Parliament. Then, as they had promised, the band split up only to live on as a surprisingly efficient and effective activist art collective. Julie Travis reports. more >

In Laboratory
Saving Internet Radio
On May 21, 2002 the US Librarian of congress announced that he was rejecting a draconian set of recommendations about the amount of money that should be paid to the artists and record companies whose work is broadcast via the internet. While the rejection these recommendations that would have financially cripple the growth of the fledgling internet radio can only be a good thing, the decision of what amount of money the artists and record companies should be paid is still being decided. But what is internet radio? Why is it important? And what can you do about it anyway? Grant Balfour investigates. more >

In Switchboard
Fortunate Son
In 1999, James Hatfield's book, Fortunate Son was published and almost immediately taken off the shelves amid revelations that its author had once been imprisoned for attempting to hire a hit-man. The book, amongst other things, alleges that George Bush Senior arranged to have his son's conviction for cocaine possession expunged from the records. In May 2001, a month after Fortunate Son was republished, Hatfield's body was found in a hotel room. What is the story behind the story of Fortunate Son? Gavin MacDonald investigates. more >

In Switchboard
Woomera
Woomera, a former missile testing base in the remote southern Australian desert, houses one of Australia's largest centres for detaining of refugees awaiting their asylum claims to be processed. Earlier this month, a group of protesters and activists managed to breach the camp's outer skin. 50 detainees escaped. More than two days on, 10 of the escapees remained on the run. Activist Aizura Hankin reports from the scene.
more >

In Magick
Shamanism in a nutshell (2)
Shamanistic practice has an incredibly vast range of applications including, business, warfare, prosperity, employment, children, love and friendship, all designed maximise the health of the spirit.
JanFreya investigates. more >

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The Autopsy - spectacle or science?
The first public autopsy in Britain for 170 years was greeted with reactions almost as predictable as the process of the postmortem itself. But why have the medical establishment and the media been so squeamish? Brooke Magnanti investigates. more >
[published 11/23/2002]

Crass: Still Relevant in 2002?
From 1978 to 1984, the seminal punk band Crass shook the music world down to its ideological roots, attacking hypocrisy and authoritarianism with little more than a fierce do-it-yourself attitude, a cutting sense of humour. At their height, without radio play, advertising or major label support, the band could sell 20,000 singles in a week. Their condemnation of Thatcher and the Falklands War, "How Does It Feel to Be Mother of 1,000 Dead," saw them discussed in Parliament. Then, as they had promised, the band split up only to live on as a surprisingly efficient and effective activist art collective. Julie Travis reports. more >
[published 10/06/2002]

Saving Internet Radio
On May 21, 2002 the US Librarian of congress announced that he was rejecting a draconian set of recommendations about the amount of money that should be paid to the artists and record companies whose work is broadcast via the internet. While the rejection these recommendations that would have financially cripple the growth of the fledgling internet radio can only be a good thing, the decision of what amount of money the artists and record companies should be paid is still being decided. But what is internet radio? Why is it important? And what can you do about it anyway? Grant Balfour investigates. more >
[published 05/19/2002]

Fortunate Son
In 1999, James Hatfield's book, Fortunate Son was published and almost immediately taken off the shelves amid revelations that its author had once been imprisoned for attempting to hire a hit-man. The book, amongst other things, alleges that George Bush Senior arranged to have his son's conviction for cocaine possession expunged from the records. In May 2001, a month after Fortunate Son was republished, Hatfield's body was found in a hotel room. What is the story behind the story of Fortunate Son? Gavin MacDonald investigates. more >
[published 05/12/2002]

Woomera
Woomera, a former missile testing base in the remote southern Australian desert, houses one of Australia's largest centres for detaining of refugees awaiting their asylum claims to be processed. Earlier this month, a group of protesters and activists managed to breach the camp's outer skin. 50 detainees escaped. More than two days on, 10 of the escapees remained on the run. Activist Aizura Hankin reports from the scene.
more >
[published 04/28/2002]

Shamanism in a nutshell (2)
Shamanistic practice has an incredibly vast range of applications including, business, warfare, prosperity, employment, children, love and friendship, all designed maximise the health of the spirit.
JanFreya investigates. more >
[published 04/14/2002]

Holy Cross: Back to school
Earlier this year, the Holy Cross school in Ardoyne became a flashpoint of violence and demonstration echoing Irish sectarianism that stretches back to the nineteenth century. Mr Y discusses some of the international reaction to the events... more >
[published 12/08/2001]

Hawksmoor
The templar architecture of Nicholas Hawksmoor is associated with murder, macabre cults, malevolent energies and occult practice. But why has his work taken on such dark resonance? And why only now? Catherine Wright investigates. more >
[published 11/30/2001]

Shamanism in a nutshell (1)
Shamanism, a widely misunderstood and misused word, has been used to describe everything from tribal magicians, spiritual healers, medicine men, and sometimes any nature based form of spirituality, magic, or religion. This broad and vague usage brings with it a lot of miscommunication and confusion. Lothar Tuppan investigates. more >
[published 09/29/2001]

Life during wartime
Here in America, we're awash in red white and blue and flags flying from currency exchanges, taxicabs, suburban homes and government offices. As if they were Christmas carols, "The Star Spangled Banner" and "God Bless America" can be heard on every radio and at every corner. And our president talks of "War," of a "Crusade." "This will not stand," he cries. Cherry Bomb is in America. more >
[published 09/21/2001]

Around the USA
"Yesterday was September 11, and it was one of my best friend's birthdays. We'd been trying to talk her into ditching her classes for the day but she'd have none of it. So I rode the el with her to work - it was my first day temping at at Chicago's NBC tower. We were both pretty tired and didn't say too much on the ride, but as I got off, I wished her a great day." Read Cherry's experience of the day the world got scarier. more >
[published 09/21/2001]

New York: On the Ground
I could feel the heat three hundred yards away; everything on four or five floors, people and office equipment, came raining down on the crowd. We all ran north while it fell and got away before it hit because it was high up. As I glanced back I saw the contents of the floors: all on fire, people and building, killed without a second to reconsider their life. George Minarik was in New York. more >
[published 09/15/2001]

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